Category Archives: United Kingdom

Mapping the action on International Women’s Day ’17

Map showing the locations (mainly at country resolution level) for events and news about women in aquaculture, fisheries and seafood in honor of International Women’s Day 2017. If you have more events from 8 March 2017 to put on this map, please let us know at: e-mail genderaquafish@gmail.com.

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Click this LINK to view the interactive version of of the above map, created with eSpatial mapping software.

Before, during and after 8 March 2017 (International Women’s Day), news, tweets and posts flooded in relating to the Day. Our group shared these events via two roundup messages. We have now put the events onto the map above, using eSpatial mapping software, and generous assistance from Ciara at eSpatial (thank you Ciara!).

To read the details of any event, click on the marker for it. We have placed the event marker on the country (sometimes city or state) where the event happened, although many have global or regional significance.

This seemed to be the most active IWD ever from a fisheries, aquaculture and seafood industry perspective. Let’s hope it is a sign of an active and fruitful year ahead for gender equality in the sector!

Still few women leaders in 100 top seafood companies

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Shrimp processing in Bangladesh. Worldwide, women are the most common workers on the factory floor, but in top seafood companies are rare on company boards and in senior management.  Photo: M. Nuruzzaman, Bangladesh.

Women may be numerous on the factory floors of top seafood producers but, at the top of the companies, their numbers are small. Marie-Christine Monfort, a seafood industry insider herself, conducted a follow-up survey to track changes since she authored an earlier report for FAO (see our previous post). The recent study found that the number of women in senior leadership positions shifted little between 2014 and 2016.

Some quick facts from the latest study:

  • Only one company (Marusen Chiyoda Suisan, Japan) is headed by a woman
  • Nearly half the companies for which details are available (38 of 71) have no women on their boards
  • Noway (31%) and China (20%) companies have the highest percentage of women board members, and Chile and Japan the lowest (2%), followed closely by UK (4%)
  • The average percent of women on boards in all the top companies surveyed is 9.1%

The report recommends that the time has come for the sector to encourage more women in top ranks and give them more of a say in decision-making.

The report can be downloaded here.

Tips from the expert: on-the-job gender training

Dr Anne Coles, International Gender Studies Centre at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Univ, UK.

Dr Anne Coles, Northern Hokkaido trawler port, August 2013. Photo: A. Coles, International Gender Studies Centre at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Univ, UK.

One of the biggest challenges for achieving gender equality is educating the present generation of leaders, project managers and other experts on the basic concepts and how they apply in daily work.

Dr Anne Coles, a gender expert with extensive experience of research in migration, gender, development and social change, and also in delivering in-service training in gender in a wide range of sectors, has distilled her experience in these tips.

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Download notes Anne Coles Gender Training Note

Gender Training for Development Sectors or Project Offices

 By Dr Anne Coles
International Gender Studies at LMH Oxford University
Compiled December 2013

The following points are often helpful when providing gender training tailored to the needs of development professionals working in particular areas or sectors:

There needs to be a commitment to the training course by the person in charge of the project

The participants ideally include some staff who are already generally sensitised to gender issues (gender 101) or who at least recognise the need for a gender approach in the particular circumstances. Again ideally, it includes some participants who are sufficiently senior to be able to promote a gender approach, once the course convinces them of the need.

Importantly, the approach recognises that training must be relevant to the participants’ own work

Ideally, the trainer is able to make a preliminary visit to the project or is able to learn about it in advance. This is particularly useful if they do not know the area/sector.

If the trainer is an outsider, it helps to use a local co-trainer, again briefed in advance, to act as a resource person to explain the local gender situation and to lead some sessions.

While it is likely that one of the trainers is a woman, it is splendid if the other is a man.

There are various ‘tricks of the trade’ to get training off to a good start – such as asking participants what work their grandmothers and grandfathers did (at home, on the farm or whatever) and how it differs from what they and their partners do now – to give a feel for how gender roles and responsibilities are differently constructed over time and in different socio-economic circumstances. This also helps all the participants get to know each other better.

Examples of successful practice should be given, with some from the same/similar sector/area.

It can be limiting for participants to adopt a gender perspective in a particular project unless they know how it will fit in to the overall policy framework at the organisation/government level. A session on this is useful, especially if new areas of policy are being considered in headquarters. A senior administrator/manager could lead this session.

A really important part of the training is normally ‘engendering’ a piece of the participants’ own work (project/programme/policy or whatever).Typically this is done by the participants working in small groups with the trainer(s)’ help. It can begin with a gender analysis of the project and then writing gender equitable improvements into the project documents, addressing any implications in terms of resources and time. The final stage is a commitment to giving this a go!

If at all possible some funds/time should be set aside for follow-up/self-monitoring to avoid the training being ‘one off’.

Looking back at 2013

At the end of GAF4, student volunteers and Piyashi DebRoy (winner of GAF4 AquaFish CRSP Best Student Paper award congratulate all GAF4 participatns.

At the end of GAF4, student volunteers and Piyashi DebRoy (winner of GAF4 AquaFish CRSP Best Student Paper award congratulate all GAF4 participatns.

In 2013, the Genderaquafish.org website continued to develop as a global source of information sharing and news. Compared to 2012, the number of visitors grew by 16%, to over 17,000 for the year. The visitors came from even more countries than last year (163 countries, compared to 154 countries in 2012). The top 5 countries of our visitors were: India (3,695), USA (1,804), UK (1,124), Philippines (1,078), Malaysia (705).  Click here to see the complete report for 2013.

World map of visitors to Genderaquafish.org, 2013. source: WordPress Stats

World map of visitors to Genderaquafish.org, 2013. source: WordPress Stats

Summary table of visits by region 2013

By region, most visits came from Asia, followed by Europe and North America. The visits are no doubt driven not only by the interest in the topics on our website, but also by the fact that information is only in English and that internet access varies greatly across the world. We would welcome links with multi-lingual partners to share similar information and translate posts to mutual benefit.

Here is a snapshot of information from our 47 new posts and several new pages for the year!

REGIONS. Asia, Africa and Europe have been the regions most covered. Other regions were not forgotten. We covered Oceania, the Americas, and West Asia/Middle East. We even featured a story on Arctic fisheries.

THEMES. Many themes ran through our posts and events for the year. Just a few to highlight were: change, climate change, post-harvest, gender in the workplace, gendered labour studies and HIV/AIDS were just a few.

EVENTS. The main gender in aquaculture and fisheries events of 2013 that we reported were:

– the 4th Global Forum on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries (GAF4) in Yeosu, Korea; and
– the  Center for Maritime Research’s (MARE) People and the Sea conference held a session entitled ” Engaging Gender for Sustainable Fisheries Livelihoods and Improved Social Wellbeing: Perspectives from the Global North and South,” in Amsterdam in June. 
 

PUBLICATIONS. We highlighted many new publications in our posts, including one of our own, the Special Issue of the Asian Fisheries Science journal containing papers and an overview from our 2011 GAF3 Symposium.

PEOPLE. We are endeavouring to give more profile to the leaders – the people with a passion to make a difference – who supply the news and lead the studies and projects. This is a relatively new initiative, so not all of our leaders are highlighted in the posts. You can a check out a few who are through this link: posts on people.

SOCIAL MEDIA. Our Facebook page, Twitter feed, Genderaquafish Google Group, Paper.li and Flickr media outreach is all integrated, although each has different, sometimes overlapping, audiences. all audiences continued to grow slowly. Piyashi Deb Roy and Danika Kleiber have stepped up to do the regular posts to the Google Group (a big thanks to both Piyashi and Danika!) and Angela Lentisco help with a sterling job tweeting during the GAF4 event [read the tweets for day 1, day 2, day 3] (a big thanks, Angela!). N.C Shyla gave tremendous support in the posts and webpages for GAF4 (a big thanks for your work, N.C.!). 

2014 promises to be another big year for gender in aquaculture and fisheries. Thank you all for your support as readers, contributors and commentators. Your contributions, suggestions and feedback are always welcome!

Social cohesion, masculinity, conservation and more discussed by MARE Gender Panel

Angela Lentisco reports on the Centre for Maritime Research (MARE) Conference in Amsterdam (26 to 28th June 2013),  panel sessions led by Easkey Britton on Engaging Gender for Sustainable Fisheries Livelihoods and Improved Social Wellbeing: Perspectives from the Global North and South.

Men making fishing nets. Photo: E. Ellison.

Men making fishing nets, coastal western Ghana. Photo: E. Allison.

“The panel presentations (which you can download from the links on this website) were food for thought, covering aspects related to gender and fisheries/marine/coastal environment, and the improvements that need to be done in the value chain, particularly on markets, identifying possible negative consequences, and ways to empower women with special attention given to women’s own perceptions of their occupational activity and their sense of self-worth. The role that women play in social cohesion and community wellbeing appeared several times during the panel, but so did the concern on women’s overburden, and the possibility of gender based violence as an unfortunate consequence of changes in gender roles. This issue was also explored during the presentation on maritime masculinities, and the expressed need to focus some of the research on men, due to the important role they also must play in attaining equitable societies. I presented the future directions of the Genderaquafish network and discussed in more detail potential joint initiatives between the Too Big to Ignore Project and the Gender Network during coffee/lunch breaks.”

Read Angela’s full report https://genderaquafish.org/events/mare-panel-addresses-the-highs-and-lows-of-gender-issues/ and view the PPTs.

Elizabeth MatthewsUsing a gender perspective to improve marine conservation and fisheries management programs

Angela Lentisco. Getting Gender on the Fisheries and Aquaculture and Fisheries Agenda in Asia and the Pacific: 20 Years of Asian Fisheries Society Experience

Edward Allison. A ‘provocation’ on maritime masculinities – and why they matter for marine resource management

Minghua Zhao.  Women and Social Cohesion: Preliminary Findings in Fishing Communities in Three EU Countries

NC Britton. The hidden costs of gender-based violence in an Irish fishing community: a new pathway to policy and structural change

Easkey Britton. Women as agents of wellbeing in Northern Ireland fishing households

Women in the EU Fish Processing Economy

Fish processor, Poland. Source: www.poland-fish.com.

Fish processor, Poland. Source: http://www.poland-fish.com.

In 2012, the European Union (EU) Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF), through the Joint Research Centre of the EU, published a report on the Economic Performance of the EU Fish Processing Industry Sector (STECF-OWP-12-01). 

In aggregate from the reporting countries, the 2011 employment statistics show that women and men are almost evenly balanced, in terms of numbers of jobs. Looking at different countries, however, the figures differ. Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland have more than 60% women fish processing employees, whereas Malta and the UK have more than 60% of men employees. In Europe, fish processing about 150,000 people. France, Poland, Spain and the United Kingdom supported the largest workforces, with more than 10,000 each.

Percent women (blue) and men (red) in each reporting EU country. Source. STECF report

Percent women (blue bar) and men (red bar) by EU reporting country. Source. STECF report)

This report (link for download) should be read in conjunction with the STECF report on employment and other economic parameters in the aquaculture sector (see: /counting-womens-participation-in-eu-aquaculture/). The EU is taking measures to improve its fisheries economic statistics, including gender-disaggregated data. To date, however, no gender-disaggregated data are available from capture fisheries.

Counting Women’s Participation in EU Aquaculture

Carp, Czeck Republic. Source: The Prague Post 21 Dec 2011.

Carp, Czeck Republic. Source: The Prague Post 21 Dec 2011, Walter Novak.

A new EU report on the European Union member countries’ aquaculture sector contains some basic gender-disaggregated data on employment in the production segment of aquaculture. Although the statistics are incomplete, they nevertheless provide some useful information. The report is called: The Economic Performance of the EU Aquaculture Sector – 2012 exercise. (STECF-13-03). It is  a joint Scientific and Policy Report and was produced by the Joint Research Centre.

The statistics in the report refers to EU companies whose main activity is aquaculture production (‘Fish Farming’ according to official codes and definitions). Although some companies do other activities (eg. processing, distribution, marketing), aquaculture production is their main activity and therefore the data (mainly) refers to production .

More detailed data for the EU aquaculture sector is available also online,  by segment (combination of main species and technology). From this data it can be seen in which sectors the presence of women is more important (eg.  shellfish gathering in several EU countries).  Thanks to Dr Jordi Guillen, an Editor for the report for these data explanations.

Download the aquaculture report here: download

The key results show that, in 2010, women comprised:

– 29 % of the EU aquaculture sector employment

– 23 % of the FTE (full-time-equivalents) in employment

– 27 % of the EU aquaculture shellfish sector employment.

–  24 % of the EU aquaculture marine sector employment.

– 29 % of the EU aquaculture freshwater sector employment (but data are  less complete than for other forms because they are not compulsory – France and Romania are  biggest employers).

Women’s participation varied greatly by country and the EU averages tended to be dominated by patterns in France and Spain. The table below is an extract of data for countries with more than 1,000 aquaculture jobs.

Country

Total Number employees (2010)

Number female

% female

% female FTE

France

19,814

7,030

35

28

Ireland

1,719

146

8

8

Portugal

2,320

430

19

18

Romania

3,933

603

15

15

Spain

27,907

8,055

29

21

UK

4,000

n.a.

n.a.

[18% women in Scottish shellfish industry]