Category Archives: Nigeria

Videos capture women in action in the seafood sector

The results of the Women in Seafood video competition are now out and all the videos can be viewed through this WSI website link.

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Click this link to go to the interactive map and open the videos. The videos are interesting, often inspiring, and all are short and to the point, ranging from 2 to 5 minutes.

Congratulations to the competition winner Carmen Pedroza-Gutiérrez for her video, “The Women of Petatán,” a very thoughtful set of interviews with women fish filleters as they worked on processing piles of fish to prepare them for the market. The video was made in Petatán , Michoacán, Mexico.

Other videos were:

Economics, trade analysis of fish value chains lacking good gender information

The 2016 conference of the International Institute for Fisheries Economics and Trade addressed how to incorporate the gender dimension into fish value chain analysis, especially when very limited gender information is available. The report of the gender sessions are now online.

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Woman at Tambak Lorok, Central Jawa, Indonesia, brings two yellowfin tuna ashore. Photo: Zahrah Izzaturrahim.

The 14 presentations and discussions on gender at IIFET-2016 highlighted that sex-disaggregated data and indicators must be improved. Using whatever information they could collect, experts presented gender analyses of value chains in Africa (Malawi and Nigeria), Asia (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand), North America (Mexico) and the Pacific (Solomon Islands), and global efforts on fisheries performance indicators and data sets. The presenters and participants discussed how, in these value chains, women are critical to adding value to fish, although within the household and society, ultimately men still make most of the key household decisions, sometimes despite interventions that seek to empower women. The gender report concludes by making some suggestions to IIFET in its future work on gender in fisheries economics and trade.

Read more the full report on the gender papers at IIFET-2016 here.

Gender on the agenda at IIFET-2016

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Dr Cornelia Nauen delivers Prof. Stella Williams’ acceptance address to IIFET-2016 on the award of the IIFET 2016 Distinguished Service Award. Photo: IIFET.

The 2016 biennial Conference of the International Institution of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET) (11-15 July, Aberdeen UK), recognized Professor Stella Williams’ by awarding her with its 2016 Distinguished Service Award (DSA).

The DSA announcement said that “Professor Stella Williams embodies IIFET’s goals of fostering global interaction between academia, trade, and government on the economics of fisheries policy and seafood trade. She has made significant contributions enabling individuals of different professional orientations and countries to exchange information, data, and perspectives on fisheries issues. Because she has devoted her long and productive professional career, as well as her personal energy, to building bridges between academia and governments, farmers, and fishers, to foster better research, collaboration, policy and equity, with a special focus on gender equity, Dr. Williams was selected as the recipient of this year’s IIFET Distinguished Service Award.” [To read Professor Williams inspiring speech, click here, and to see more on Professor’s Williams work on gender in fisheries, click here.] As Professor Williams was not able to attend IIFET, her acceptance address was delivered beautifully on her behalf by Dr Cornelia Nauen, the President of Mundus Maris. Professor Williams is the also the Vice-President of Mundus Maris. [See also the following links from Mundus Maris on IIFET-2016 and Prof Williams: Pic of the Month, and IIFET-2016.]

Congratulations, Stella, on the DSA, and thank you for all your commitment and untiring service

Following the gradual strengthening of gender research presentations in IIFET over the years (e.g., see IIFET-2012 report) IIFET-2016 also saw an increase in the exposure of gender research as judged by the papers presented. A Special Session (Gender Research as a New Frontier in Fisheries and Aquaculture Economics) was held over two normal conference sessions, plus a session on gender in the main conferences sessions, and several individual papers on gender in other sessions. In total, about 15 papers and a panel specifically addressed gender. An overview report will be made available in the near future.

A group of presenters and participants at the end of the Gender Special Session at IIFET-2016, 13 July 2016, Aberdeen. Photo: IIFET.

A group of presenters and participants at the end of the Gender Special Session at IIFET-2016, 13 July 2016, Aberdeen. Photo: IIFET.

The Special Session and other gender highlights were supported by grant funds from the USA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Fisheries) and the World Bank, for which IIFET is very grateful.

The support included the the selection by an expert panel of the inaugural Rosemary Firth Award, made possible by NOAA’s grant. This inaugural award was granted for the best gender presentation, but IIFET envisages that in future the award will be for best paper.

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On the prize podium (L-R)- Chikondi Manyungwa (Rosemary Firth Prize winner), Dan Holland (IIFET President) and Zahra Izzaturrahim (Highly Commended presentation) from the gender sessions at IIFET-2016. Photo: IIFET

Chikondi Manyungwa (Department of Fisheries, Lilongwe, Malawi) won the inaugural Rosemary Firth Award for her presentation, “An investigation of women participation in fish value chains and value chain governance in Malawi: a case of Msaka on Lake Malawi and Kachulu on Lake Chilwa.

IIFET also decided to make a Highly Commended Zahrah Izzaturrahim, Department of Anthropology, University of Diporegoro, Semarang, Indonesia for her presentation “Measuring the role of women in fisheries: A Case from Tambak Lorok, Central Jawa, Indonesia.”

It was very pleasing to see how strongly participants and presenters were engaged in the discussion and questions during the sessions and at social events.

 

 

1-2-3: Counting the ways women access fish

Women fish processors in Sokone, Senegal. Photo: Robert Lee, FAO.

Women fish processors in Sokone, Senegal. Photo: Robert Lee, FAO.

In a recent FAO report (A Review of Women’s Access to Fish in Small Scale Fisheries), Angela Lentisco and Robert Lee have gone beyond the typical portrayal of women as fish processors and marketers have reviewed and categorized three main ways in which women access fish in small scale fisheries. First is primary access through fishing and financing/owning fishing operations; second is through close personal relationships including family; and third is through the normal purchases. By conceptualising women’s access in this more structured way, policy and action to assist women’s empowerment and equality in fish value chains can be better formulated. Angela and Robert first explored this approach in their paper resulting from their paper at the 4th Global Symposium on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries (GAF4) – read their earlier paper here.

The report, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Circular 1098 can be downloaded at this link.

Abstract: Women play a critical role in every link of the value chain in small-scale fisheries, although their best-known roles are in processing and marketing of fish and other fishery products. This perception of the highly gender-segregated division of labour (men fishing / women processing) has shaped the generalized approach in supporting development initiatives for small-scale fisheries. More often than not, this approach targets men as fishers, and women as processors and marketers of fishery products. However, this generalization has also made fisheries governance blind to women’s other valuable inputs to the sector. In fact, their roles can and should go beyond postharvest and marketing. However, the lack of utilization of their additional contribution has deterred, for example, women’s participation in fisheries resource management and policy decision-making.

The present review aims to move policy attention beyond the generalized, and perhaps limited, perception of women as fish processors and marketers and in this way enhance their participation in fisheries resource management and decision-making. The study describes the different ways women have access to fish in small-scale fisheries: as primary users (when they fish by themselves or they finance fishery operations), secondary users (when they access fish through kinship or other close relationships), and tertiary users (when they use capital to buy fish directly from fishers or traders). The review provides case studies to illustrate some of the issues that tend to keep women in marginalized positions along the value chain. Factors and processes that can contribute to improve women’s participation and decision-making in small-scale fisheries, such as those that challenge conventional approaches based on traditional or “typical” gender roles and obsolete institutional arrangements, are also given. The document also discusses how participation can be improved by raising awareness on gender equality issues along the value chain through applying a gender lens, by providing appropriate support to women’s organizations, including formal recognition of their professional activities, by understanding the socioeconomic context and the particular needs of small-scale fisheries, by giving due attention to power and power relationships, and by taking greater account of the contribution of women in fisheries. As neither women nor men form homogenous groups, the challenge is even greater for women to have access to productive tools and services, which if secured can give them a greater say and control over fisheries resources, thereby increasing their social capital and financial capital. These reflections can be introduced in existing resource management arrangements such as co-management or community based management, and can probably empower women and improve their participation in fishery resource management decision-making.

The reflections in this review can and should be used as guidance and discussion material to develop interventions under the Global Assistance Programme in support of the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication.

GAF4 Spotlight was on Gender and Change

The full report, program and all slide presentations from the 4th Global Symposium on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries are NOW ONLINE!

Fishery changes shift working spaces, create and destroy jobs and bring overlaps in women’s and men’s roles. 

At the end of GAF4, student volunteers and Piyashi DebRoy (winner of GAF4 AquaFish CRSP Best Student Paper award congratulate all GAF4 participatns.

Congratulations to GAF4 participants from our student volunteers from Chonnam National University, Moon Eun-Ji (left) and Bak So-Hyeon (right), and Piyashi DebRoy (center and winner of GAF4 AquaFish CRSP Best Student Paper award) .

“Gender and fisheries studies, therefore, are increasingly addressing these changes and how women and men were affected by them,” said Dr Nikita Gopal who led the Program Committee that organized this highly energetic and successful event.  GAF4 also continued to fill out the global picture showing that women and gender issues are still not properly understood in the fisheries sector.”

Feedback declared GAF4 the most successful and highest quality of the 6 women in fisheries/gender in aquaculture and fisheries events held by the Asian Fisheries Society over the last 15 years.

On Genderaquafish.org you will find:

Prof. Stella Williams leads new Nigerian Women in R&D Initiative

Dr Stella Williams addresses the NIWARD meeting. Source: FUTA

Dr Stella Williams addresses the NIWARD meeting. Source: FUTA

A bold new Nigerian initiative to support Nigerian rural women and women academics has launched, led by Dr Stella Williams, well know to many of the Genderaquafish.org followers.

The Nigerian Women in Agricultural
Research for Development (NIWARD) initiative will be hosted at the Centre for Gender Issues in Science and Technology (CEGIST) of the Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA). Professor Williams is the National President.

The Hon.Nigerian  Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr Akinwunmi Adesina, commended the initiative when he delivered The FOUNDATION DAY LECTURE on Friday, 17th May, 2013.

Read about the inaugural meeting of NIWARD here: Link