Bangaldesh: women’s aquaculture assets built faster through groups

Bangladesh: fish ponds. Photo: Bread for the World, USAID

Rigorous studies on the effects of introduced fish pond and vegetable technologies in Bangladesh show that “..women’s assets increase more relative to men’s when technologies are disseminated through women’s groups”, indicating that the gendered outcomes of new technologies depend on how they are introduced. This and related studies are reported in papers in the latest edition of the Journal of Development Effectiveness (http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g938482929) and in a publication of the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Author’s (Agnes Quisumbing, IFPRI) address: a.quisumbing@cgiar.org

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/breadfortheworld/3963781730/

The following IFPRI paper also relates to the same Bangladesh research and is available for free download: Evaluating the long-term impact of antipoverty interventions in Bangladesh: An overview

This is an overview of research on the impact of “three antipoverty interventions in Bangladesh—the introduction of new agricultural technologies, educational transfers, and microfinance—on monetary and nonmonetary measures of well-being. This paper begins by setting out the conceptual framework, methodology, and empirical methods used for the evaluation of long-term impacts. It discusses the context of the evaluations and the longitudinal data used. Key findings from the individual papers are then presented, followed by an indicative analysis of the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. The overview concludes with implications for programs and policy.”

Authors: Quisumbing, Agnes R., Baulch, Bob, Kumar, Neha

Download at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19439342.2011.570447 or

http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01077.pdf

2 responses to “Bangaldesh: women’s aquaculture assets built faster through groups

  1. Md. Nuruzzaman, National Expert, UNIDO

    As a member of Asian Fisheries Society, may I read this article free of cost?

    • I’m afraid not as the journal is not publised by AFS. However, if your library does not have access to the journal, the author may have some complementary copies available. Meryl

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