GAF5 – 12-15 November, 2014 Lucknow, India

The 5th Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries symposium (GAF5) has now finished in Lucknow, India, as part of the 10th Indian Fisheries and Aquaculture Forum (10IFAF) of the Asian Fisheries Society Indian Branch. The final program of GAF5 is now posted. We are also gradually starting to load the abstracts and PPTs for presentations.

PRIZEWINNERS OF GAF5: We are starting to post news on GAF5 and its outcomes. Checkout the preliminary report giving the prize winners and look at one of our group photos by clicking here.

At the main Opening Ceremony of the 10th Indian Fisheries and Aquaculture Forum, the proceedings of GAF4 were launched officially, as a Special Issue of Asian Fisheries Science journal. The Special Issue will shortly be uploaded to the AFS website on the journal page.

10IFAF Official Party launches GAF4 proceedings at the main Opening Ceremony, 12 November 2014, Lucknow, India. L. to r.: Dr J.K. Jena, DG National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources (ICAR), Dr Cherdsak Virapat DG NACA, Shri Ram Naik Governor Uttar Pradesh, Dr S. Ayyappan DG ICAR, Dr M. Meenakumari DDG (Fisheries) ICAR, and Dr. B.A. Shamsundar Secretary AFSIB.

10IFAF Official Party launches GAF4 proceedings at the main Opening Ceremony, 12 November 2014, Lucknow, India. L. to r.: Dr J.K. Jena, DG National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources (ICAR), Dr Cherdsak Virapat DG NACA, Shri Ram Naik Governor Uttar Pradesh, Dr S. Ayyappan DG ICAR, Dr M. Meenakumari DDG (Fisheries) ICAR, and Dr. B.A. Shamsundar Secretary AFSIB.

PRE-CONFERENCE INTERVIEW WITH MARIE-CHRISTINE MONFORT:  SeafoodSource.com has interviewed Marie-Christine Monfort who points out that the fishing industry has only one woman in the top job in the world’s 100 largest seafood companies, and why this should change, for the benefit of the industry. Marie-Christine will be talking at GAF5 in Lucknow, 12-15 November.

LUCKNOW PRESS HIGHLIGHTS GAF5; The Lucknow Pioneer mentioned some key messages from GAF5 at 10IFAF. See the article here.

25th SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin: Looking forward and back

Seaweed farming Waigina, Choiseul Province, Solomon Islands. Photo by M. Kronen, SPC WIF25.

Seaweed farming Waigina, Choiseul Province, Solomon Islands. Photo by M. Kronen, SPC WIF25.

The Secretariat for the Pacific Community (SPC), has just released its 25th Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin. Congratulations to the SPC, Bulletin Editors including current editor Dr Veikila Vuki, donors and supporters for this achievement. This issue starts with a message of support from Moses Amos, the new Director of SPC’s Fisheries, Aquaculture and Marine Ecosystems (FAME) Division, who outlines his vision for women in fisheries at the SPC.

The whole issue or individual articles can be downloaded here.

CONTENTS

New FAO online policy-makers course on gender and food security

25 July 2013, Ha Trung, Viet Nam - Farmers using a net to catch fish from a pond at their farm.  Photo: FAO

25 July 2013, Ha Trung, Viet Nam – Farmers using a net to catch fish from a pond at their farm. Photo: FAO

To educate policy-makers and programme developers, FAO, with support from the European Commission and the Gender and Water Alliance has created a new online course on gender and food security.

Here is the link for the course

http://www.fao.org/elearning/#/elc/en/course/FG

The course is free online; all it takes is your time and dedication. The 14 lessons are grouped into 3 units as follows:

Unit 1 Overview of gender concepts and principles

  • Lesson 1.1 Closing the gender gap
  • Lesson 1.2 Gender roles, gender discrimination and gender equality
  • Lesson 1.3 Gender dimensions of food and nutrition security (FNS)

Unit 2 Gender in Food and nutrition security policy and legislation

  • Lesson 2.1 International commitments on gender equality
  • Lesson 2.2 Gender statistics for informing policy and legislation
  • Lesson 2.3 Producing gender statistics
  • Lesson 2.4 Formulating gender-responsive food and nutrition security (FNS) policies
  • Lesson 2.5 Translating national food and nutrition security (FNS) policies into a gender-responsive plan of action.
  • Lesson 2.6 Gender advocacy for food and nutrition security (FNS)

Unit 3 Gender in food and nutrition security programming

  • Lesson 3.1 Conducting a gender analysis for programme design
  • Lesson 3.2 Designing gender-responsive Food and Nutrition Security projects and programmes
  • Lesson 3.3 Gender-sensitive monitoring and evaluation for Food and Nutrition Security
  • Lesson 3.4 Gender and programme implementation
  • Lesson 3.5 Addressing gender in organizations working on food and nutrition security

Yemaya August issue highlights Small Scale Fisheries Guidelines

Usha Tai in a discussion with representatives of fi shworkers organization at a meeting organized by ICSF. Photo: Yemaya Aug 2014

The August 2014 issue of Yemaya, the newsletter on gender and fisheries of the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF) is full of interesting articles. It highlights the gender implications of the new Small Scale Fisheries Guidelines, plus articles on Japan, India and The Gambia. Download the issue at this link.

Articles
  • Editorial: Nilanjana Biswas
  • Japan: Migrant hands, local profits by Kumi Soejims & Katia Frangoudes
  • Profile: “I love fishing at all times”— Jeannette Naranjo (Costa Rica) by Vivienne Solis Rivera
  • The Gambia: Trading away food security by Nilanjana Biswas
  • India: Remembering Usha Tamore by Shuddhawati S Peke
  • Milestones: The Small Scale Fisheries Guidelines by Ramya Rajagopalan
  • Japan: Sea, people and life by Katia Frangoudes & Annie Castaldo
  • What’s New Webby? GAF5 by Ramya Rajagopalanby
  • India: A question of identity (for seaweed collectors) by Sumana Narayanan
  • Q & A: Carmen, Honduras by Norman Flores and
    Vivienne Solis Rivera
  • Yemaya Mama: cartoon
  • Yemaya Recommends: Standards for collecting sex disaggregated data for gender analysis:  A guide for CGIAR researchers by Caitlin Kieran & Cheryl Doss

World Bank speaks out on what constrains women’s voice and agency

Woman activist from the Rwanda Women Network taken at a meeting of the Village of Hope project. Photo: Mary Ellsberg in "Voices and Agency."

Woman activist from the Rwanda Women Network taken at a meeting of the Village of Hope project. Photo: Mary Ellsberg in “Voices and Agency.”

Voice and Agency: Empowering women and girls for shared prosperity

In his Foreword to this strong, empirical book recently released by the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, the World Bank Group President and himself a physician and anthropologist, says:

“Our flagship World Development Report 2012 demonstrated that gender equality and economic development are inextricably linked. It showed that equality not only guarantees basic rights but also plays a vital role in promoting the robust, shared growth needed to end extreme poverty in our increasingly competitive, globalized world. The persistent constraints and deprivations that prevent many of the world’s women from achieving their potential have huge consequences for individuals, families, communities, and nations. The 2012 report recognized that expanding women’s agency—their ability to make decisions and take advantage of opportunities— is key to improving their lives as well as the world we all share.

Voice and Agency: Empowering Women and Girls for Shared Prosperity represents a major advance in global knowledge on this critical front. The vast data and thousands of surveys distilled here cast important light on the nature of constraints women and girls continue to face globally.”

Download the report here (large download file)

[Thanks to Cornelie Quist for alerting us to this publication.]

Extract from the Executive Summary: This report distills an array of data, studies and evidence to shine a spotlight on the pervasive deprivations and constraints that face women and girls worldwide—from epidemic gender-based violence to laws and norms that prevent women from owning property, working, making decisions about their own lives and having influence in society. It identifies some promising programs and interventions to address these deprivations and constraints.

Policymakers and stakeholders need to tackle this agenda, drawing on evidence about what works and systematically tracking progress on the ground. This must start with reforming discriminatory laws and follow through with concerted policies and public actions, including multi-sectoral approaches that engage with men and boys and challenge adverse social norms. There is much to gain. Increasing women’s voice and agency is a valuable end in its own right. And it underpins achievement of the World Bank Group’s twin goals of eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity for girls and boys, women and men, around the world.

Gender and small-scale fisheries in the central Philippines

People reef gleaning at low tide, Danajon Bank, Bohol Province, Central Philippines. Photo: Danika Kleiber.

People reef gleaning at low tide, Danajon Bank, Bohol Province, Central Philippines. Photo: Danika Kleiber.

In earlier posts on this site, we highlighted papers arising from the work of Danika Kleiber and her colleagues on gender in the Northern Bohol section of the Danajon Bank in the Central Philippines and on a global overview of gender in small scale fisheries. With pleasure, we draw your attention to Danika’s doctoral thesis, recently accepted by the University of British Columbia, Canada, and entitled: GENDER AND SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES IN THE CENTRAL PHILIPPINES. This thesis, as well as its accompanying papers, make a compelling and empirically justified case for the importance of factoring in women’s fishing work in fisheries management, policy and economics.

Here is the link to the thesis

And the links to our two earlier posts on Dr Kleiber’s work:

Counting all the fishers: a global overview

Philippines reef study shows the importance of defining “fishing”

Abstract of Thesis: This dissertation provides new evidence for why women should be included in smallscale fisheries assessments. Women are commonly overlooked in fisheries science and management because they are assumed not to fish, or to fish very little. My research focuses on community-based managed fisheries in the Central Philippines. I begin with a literature review of women’s fishing around the world, revealing that it is common, diverse, and dynamic. Women fishers also often focus on species and habitats different from those in men’s fishing. Notably, however, the review also identified a considerable data gap in quantitative assessments of women’s fishing.

I designed my case study specifically to quantify women’s contributions to the total community catch and effort. I found that women – who totaled 42% of all fishers – generated about one quarter of the total fishing effort and of the catch biomass. Explicit consideration of women’s fishing cast a spotlight on gleaning, an overlooked fishing method in which animals are collected in intertidal habitats. Almost all the women and half of the men gleaned. I found that gleaning primarily targeted sessile invertebrates, and was an important source of food, particularly when other fishing was not available.

Marine management that affects gleaners – such as no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) placed in intertidal areas – needs to consider distinct ecological and social features of gleaning. On that basis, I used a gender lens to examine community-based management in the form of no-take MPAs. In this cultural context resource management is a male sphere, both in perception and in practice. Women were less likely to feel that the MPA had a positive effect on their fishing, with MPAs mostly identified as a management measure for finfish. Women were also less likely to participate actively in MPA management.

In summary, my focus on women should prompt reexamination of how fishing is defined, who counts, and who is counted. Integration of women’s issues into fisheries management requires attention to gleaning, and exploration of alternative management methods. To overlook women, however, creates substantial underestimation of fishing labour and catch – with consequent worsening of our prospects for fisheries management globally.

 

NACA and partners studying gender in aquaculture in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam

Mrs Xiem (Ca Mau, Vietnam), one of the largest crab farmers in Vietnam, and local women workers. Photo: Ha Thu http://hathutranslator.wordpress.com/2012/05/19/the-role-of-women-in-vietnamese-aquaculture/

Mrs Xiem (Ca Mau, Vietnam), one of the largest crab farmers in Vietnam, and local women workers. Photo: Ha Thu http://hathutranslator.wordpress.com/2012/05/19/the-role-of-women-in-vietnamese-aquaculture/

In 2012, the NACA (Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific) Governing Council put gender issues on the work programme as a cross-cutting issue (see our post). In 2013, NACA held a special workshop at GAF4, with Norad support, to develop ideas for gender mainstreaming at NACA (see our GAF4 Report for a short summary of the Workshop outcomes).

Early this year, the USAID-MARKET project in the lower Mekong countries, NACA and partners in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam combined to start the project: Thematic Studies on Gender in aquaculture in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam.

Read about this project and how it is progressing. Come to GAF5 in Lucknow in November )

 

 

How can we incorporate gender into our research and development approaches?

Participants at the ASEM gender in aquaculture training course, 2012 contemplate the basics. Source: Jariah Masud.

Participants at the ASEM gender in aquaculture training course, 2012 contemplate the basics. Source: Jariah Masud.

More development research institute leaders, researchers and project developers are aware of the importance of gender equality in programs and project activities. Some have made public commitments to action through their work. Often, however, these good intentions are thwarted by lack of knowledge and expertise on how to go about it. Of course, in an ideal world, the solution is to call in the experts, and this is still important. However, experts are much in demand and may not be readily accessible. How can you educate yourself about research and project development methods? One way is to learn from what the experts have written, of course!

This post highlights some condensed wisdom that has recently been published, plus provides links to some of our previous posts on gender research and development methods.  If you know of other handy materials, we would welcome learning of them, so that we can help share them with our readers

Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data

Visit this site to download the document

This 6 page guide is an excellent condensation of the key points, highlighted in the list of “MUST HAVES FOR GENDER ANALYSIS.” It is published by IFPRI on behalf of the CGIAR Policies, Institutions and Markets research program.

  • Collect information about both men and women. Ask questions about specific individuals or groups and identify them by sex.
  • Collect information from men and women. This does not necessarily require interviewing men and women in the same household. Studies that fail to include male and female respondents will be subject to biases; the extent of the bias will depend on the knowledge and perceptions of the respondent(s).
  • All data collection methods must be context specific. Questions must be adapted to the context. Those collecting and analyzing the data need to understand gender roles and social dynamics. This knowledge must also guide the settings for interviews or focus groups.
  • Budget for the additional costs of collecting sex-disaggregated data.
  • Work with a gender expert early in the process to define the research question and methodology.
  • Researchers collecting data from human subjects must ensure that the participants have completed a confidentiality and consent agreement. While these requirements are important for all research, they are essential for gender analyses that address sensitive topics such as asset ownership and domestic violence.
  • Comparing male and female headed households is not gender analysis. Differences between these diverse household types cannot necessarily be attributed to the sex of the household head.

Value chain analysis and gender

This publication, Review of gender and value chain analysis, development and evaluation toolkits, from ILRI on behalf of the CGIAR research program on Livestock and Fish, is essentially a review of qualitative and quantitative tools found in workshop materials, manuals, guide books, handbooks, reports, research papers and toolkits themselves. It also gives sample rapid assessment tools for livestock and crop value chains.

Visit this site to download the publication

other resources from previous genderaquafish.org posts

We have posted in the past on a number of other research and project development resources. Here are their links.

1. From the FAO-Spain Regional Fisheries Livelhioods Programme

How to mainstream gender in small scale fisheries

RFLP Gender Mainstreaming manual

2. IFPRI on gender data in agriculture

Data needs for gender analysis in agriculture